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New electric mobility

Surging green energy generation is creating surpluses, in turn supporting the rise of electric transport

Marvin Mulkey ditched his Ford Escort Wagon about five years ago, and now employs a 100% EV to drive for both Uber and Lyft in Portland, Oregon. "I decided to stick it to the Saudis, so that's why I bought this Leaf," he says. Mulkey's vanity licence plate is a playful twist on the words zero oil. On a single charge, he says his Nissan Leaf can run about two trips to the airport or about 10 downtown. It's a shorter range than an internal-combustion engine (Ice) can offer, but Mulkey has an edge. Courtesy of the local utility, Portland Gas and Electric, he can charge up his Leaf in about 30 minutes—for free. "There's a real camaraderie down here, at The Plug," Mulkey adds, as Teslas and Bolts

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