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Decarbonising LNG: the heat is on

When the largest buyer in the largest consuming country commits to net-zero emissions by 2050, suppliers must start to respond. And they are

The LNG industry has over the past 18 months had to confront much more directly the potentially existential threat of the Paris Agreement. A key element of that agreement—“to achieve a balance between anthropogenic emissions by sources and removals by sinks of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the second half of this century”—has spurred companies, countries and even continents to pledge net-zero GHG emissions by 2050. It can be argued that the LNG industry should have responded sooner, given the Paris Agreement was reached in 2015. Belatedly, it was a series of events in 2020 that proved to be the spark for the current explosion of interest in so-called carbon-neutral LNG. Customer-led “In the

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