Related Articles
Forward article link
Share PDF with colleagues

Australian LNG under pressure

A global supply glut, cheaper rivals and tightening emissions policies are a growing problem for Australia’s costly gas-export plants

At least two of Australia's new liquefied natural gas-export facilities in Queensland may run under capacity until global demand exceeds supply around 2022. Even then, the need for their product might be less than thought. Changing buyer needs, an unanticipated shortage of onshore coal-bed methane (CBM) to supply the trains, and possible federal intervention to restrict exports in preference for eastern Australia's tightening domestic market could see plants run under nameplate capacity for some years. Longer term, cheaper LNG and the adoption of clean technologies could strand the high-priced Queensland assets altogether. Matt Howell, senior research analyst for consultancy Wood Mackenzie

Comments

Comments

{{ error }}
{{ comment.comment.Name }} • {{ comment.timeAgo }}
{{ comment.comment.Text }}
Also in this section
Angola brings new deepwater project online
10 May 2021
Production at Zinia Phase 2 comes after years of upstream stagnation
Iraq renews gas drive
8 May 2021
Baghdad turns again to China to develop its second largest gasfield
European power trading innovation: Old dogs learn new tricks
7 May 2021
The founders of Energy Quantified by Montel have built analysis models before. But this time they have torn up the rulebook
Sign Up For Our Newsletter
Project Data
Maps
PE Store
Social Links
Social Feeds
Featured Video